Forum Posts

aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Beauty
by LUCY WOOD JUN 28, 2018 Say the words "Kylie Jenner," and anyone will instantly think of flawless brows, highlighted cheekbones and of course, the lips. For a long time she kept her highly coveted beauty secrets guarded by a three-headed momager, but then Kylie Cosmetics was born and the rest is history. Nowadays Jenner is forever swatching and sharing the holy grail goodies from her own makeup range but, for the first time, Kylie has talked through her entire beauty routine from start to finish in a new video tutorial for Vogue. Grab a pen and paper because you will want to make notes. As well as spilling cute family stories, like the time Kris Jenner accidentally used black kohl as lip liner on the way to Disneyland, and toying with the prospect of daughter Stormi one day being a beauty guru, Kylie had some valuable makeup hacks to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCJ6U7mQmYw&feature=youtu.be Straight out of her beauty bible? Use concealer as eye primer, swap your shadow brushes for a fingertip, bake after your bronzer, and never conceal your forehead. That last one is all very well and good when you have Kylie's flawless skin made from polished, rich-person marble, though. Of course, most of her routine comes straight from Kylie Cosmetics, but there are a few other product name-drops to go straight on your shopping list. Marc Jacobs Fantasy Dew Drops illuminator makes the cut, with Chanel Les Beiges Healthy Glow Sheer Color powder, and Diorshow Blackout Mascara. But honestly, I'm just confused by the fact she puts blush on her chin. This will not look cute on most non-Jenner human beings, FYI.
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aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Beauty
by CHLOE METZGER JUN 25, 2018 Let's be real—the ultimate goal of applying foundation is to make your face look like an ethereal, glowing slab of marble with nary a blemish nor scar. But the ultimate result, despite your best efforts, is usually a very visible, slightly chalky mask that screams, "Look! I tried to do a thing!" But doing your makeup shouldn't be a feat shrouded in mystery. So to simplify the foundation process, I broke down the exact steps, products, and techniques that'll help you get the most natural-looking finish, every single time. STEP 1: Clean It Listen, I'm choosing to believe that all of you sufficiently remove your makeup and wash your face every night, so there should be no reason to really clean your face in the morning. But if you do have some leftover makeup (ugh), oil, or grime, lightly swab your skin with a cotton pad soaked in cleansing water to make sure you start your foundation routine with a clean, oil-free slate. STEP 2: Prep It Foundation gets a bad rap for looking dry and flaky, but 99 percent of the time, it's actually due to user error (sorry, user). Even the heaviest of matte foundations can still look soft and natural, as long as you correctly prep and hydrate your skin with a good moisturizer. After cleansing, massage a thin layer of moisturizer all over your face (avoiding the eyelids), letting the cream sink in for 5-10 minutes before applying your foundation. STEP 3: Start It Take that bottle of too-dark foundation that's been rolling around in your drawer since high school and throw it away. Right now. Then go buy a foundation that's creamy, medium-coverage, and actually matches your skin type and shade Add two pumps to your palm, then use a foundation brush (try the EcoTools Flat Brush) to dab the foundation onto your skin, starting at the center of the face and blending it outward. Don't worry about making it look perfect just yet—that part comes next. STEP 4: Blend It Here's where the second-skin magic comes in. Grab a damp makeup sponge (make sure you've already squeezed out any excess water into a paper towel), and gently dab, dab, dab—never smudge or swipe—the side of the sponge over your face to seamlessly melt the foundation into your skin. Use the pointed tip of the sponge to blend out the foundation around your nose and eyes. STEP 5: Fine-Tune It If you're not feelin' your zits, acne scars, or redness, tap on a concealer with your ring finger, let it set for five minutes, then lightly bounce the tip of your sponge over the concealer to blend it out without smudging it off. Try a thicker, full-coverage formula. STEP 6: Set It To keep your foundation from slipping and sliding by noon, dust a translucent powder over just your T-zone (where all skin types get oily first) with a giant fluffy brush, like the Real Techniques Powder Brush. Dip the brush in the powder (which powder, you ask? Already got you covered with four cult-favorite formulas, below), then tap off the excess and and swirl it over your forehead, nose, and chin in soft, concentric circles STEP 7: Admire It Congratulations—you've officially mastered smooth, glowy, non-patchy foundation without throwing your phone at the wall. Please take a few (billion) selfies, then share your new wealth of knowledge with the world.
This Is the Absolute Best Way to Apply Foundation content media
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aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Beauty
by CHLOE METZGER JUL 9, 2018 Sooner or later, everything in beauty gets a bad rap (sorry, parabens, makeup wipes, and chunky, early-aughts highlights). And while whether or not that's warranted could, for the majority of these offenders, be debated for hours, some of them are simply not up for discussion, like sulfate-filled shampoos. As a refresher: Sulfates are crazy-harsh detergents (the same ones found in dish soap) that strip all of the moisture from your hair, leaving it brittle, faded, tangled, and, yes, even oilier. They're old school and totally unnecessary, yet, for whatever reason, they're are still found in the majority of shampoos on the market (don't believe me? Go check how many of your hair products have sodium lauryl sulfate in the ingredients list). If you do find some sulfates in your favorite shampoo and you're not into the idea of damaging your hair for funsies, may I suggest trying one of my favorite sulfate-free shampoos, below? They contain all of the good, hair-hugging ingredients you want, without any of the damaging ingredients your hair doesn't. And yes, I promise they'll still get your hair really, really clean. 1. FOR LIMP, FLAT HAIR Playa Every day Shampoo, $32 Contrary to whatever your brain has been telling you, your flat, fine hair still needs moisture—just really, really lightweight moisture. This low-suds shampoo weightlessly hydrates with coconut water and aloe leaf extract, while also adding a tiny bit of volume thanks to sugar beet extract. 2. FOR BRASSY BRUNETTE HAIR DpHue Cool Brunette Shampoo, $24 If you've ever dyed or highlighted your brown hair, you know how quickly it can take on that dreaded brassiness. Enter: this hydrating shampoo. The gentle formula neutralizes orange hues with a dose of blue pigment (blue is opposite orange on the color wheel, so they cancel each other out). Use a few times a week to keep your hair bright and fresh. 3. FOR FINE, OIL-PRONE HAIR Earth's Nectar Mint Leaves & Tea Tree Shampoo, $22 Trust me—you don't need a heavy-duty, hair-stripping formula to get your greasy scalp clean. And this natural, tea tree oil–infused shampoo proves it by cutting through oils to soothe scalp irritation and banish bad smells, all without leaving your hair feeling like straw. 4. FOR THICK, FRIZZ-PRONE CURLS Briogeo Curl Charisma Rice Amino and Shea Moisture Shampoo, $24 Curly folks, take note: This ultra-moisturizing shampoo uses a blend of natural oils to hydrate and soften dry hair, plus a dose of humidity-fighting tomato ferment to keep curls from shrinking up or frizzing out. 5. FOR DRY HAIR Bumble and Bumble Hairdresser's Invisible Oil Shampoo, $31 If your hair is drier than Melba toast, look for a shampoo filled with lightweight oils—like this best-selling formula—to deeply moisturize your hair and leave it shiny. And don't worry; even though it has "oil" in its title, the formula also has serious sudsing powers that actually break down product buildup and scalp oils without stripping your hair. 6. FOR KINKY CURLS SheaMoisture Curl & Shine Shampoo, $10 Repeat after me: Curls need moisture. And if you're using anything other than a hydrating, sulfate-free shampoo, like this silk protein– and neem oil–infused formula, you're basically asking for breakage, tangles, and damage. 7. FOR COLOR-TREATED HAIR Pureology Hydrate Shampoo, $28 Sure, it's on the pricier side, but then again, it's not your average shampoo. This hydrating formula is basically the queen of all color-safe shampoos. It not only protects your hair from fading, but it also mitigates the inevitable damage that comes with each new dye job. 8. FOR FINE CURLY HAIR Ouidad Superfruit Renewal Clarifying Cream Shampoo, $21 Most curl-specific shampoos are way too rich and heavy for fine curls, which is why I'm obsessed with this cream-based clarifying shampoo from Ouidad. Not only will it keep curls moisturized with a layer of lightweight banana oil, but it'll also give your scalp that "clean" feeling, thanks to the inclusion of clarifying fruit acids. 9. FOR "REGULAR" HAIR Verb Volume Shampoo, $14 Not sure what hair type you have? Go with whatever formula makes you look like you're constantly walking by a wind machine, like this volumizing shampoo from Verb. It uses keratin proteins to amp up limp hair, plus vitamin B5 to hydrate dry ends without weighing them down.
The 9 Best Sulfate-Free Shampoos That You, Yes You, Should Be Using content media
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aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Business
By Sammi Caramela, B2B Staff Writer: July 3, 2018 Performance reviews are valuable for both employer and employee. Feedback can range from praise to guidance, allowing both the employee and the employer a chance to discuss what's working and what's not. However, giving a review is more complicated than just saying "nice job" or "needs improvement." Sometimes, there are issues that need to be addressed and explored in more depth. If you want to inspire your employees to keep up with their work or do better, you'll need to dive deeper than the traditional review process. Here's how. Provide regular, informal feedback. While performance reviews are typically scheduled to happen once or twice a year, feedback should not be limited to that short period of time. You should offering consistent assessments throughout the year so there aren't any surprises. "Don't catch your people off guard in a performance review," said Erika Rasure, assistant professor of Business and Financial Services at Maryville University. "This should not be the first time that they are hearing from you that they are not performing as expected. Be clear in writing [and] sending calendar invites and setting expectations and the tone for the meetings." Additionally, you might adapt your strategy to only address issues or employees who aren't performing as well as others. You don't want to neglect workers just because they don't need as much guidance. In fact, if you don't express your gratitude, they might lose passion or motivation. "Highly valuable employees who do their job and do it well are often not the priority of concern in performance review cycles, resulting in missed opportunities to communicate how much the organization values the drive and the results of the top performers," said Rasure. "An unexpected 'keep up the great work' email, a quick phone call or text sends a consistent signal to your employee that you are paying attention and value what they do." Be honest. No worker is perfect, and there will always be room for improvement. Decide what is worth addressing and don't hesitate in doing so. If there is an issue that you know is affecting you and your team, you shouldn't avoid it. Tip-toeing around the subject will not get you anywhere. James R. Bailey, professor of leadership at the George Washington University School of Business, said to be truthfully (but not brutally) honest with workers. Deliver feedback in a way that you would want to receive it if you were the employee. The discussion is crucial and unavoidable, so choose an appropriate approach and stick with it. "If someone is a poor performer and you don't squarely address it, know that everyone else in the office knows that the person is a poor performer, and [employees] will brand you as weak or cowardly for not addressing the situation," Bailey said. Do it face-to-face. The written review should be a brief but direct overview of discussion points, making for a more nuanced face-to-face conversation. Schedule a meeting in a coffee shop or out-of-office location to provide a comfortable atmosphere. Or if you're reviewing remote workers, schedule a video chat so you're still having a live conversation. This approach leaves room for discussion and feedback on their end and prevents any miscommunications. "The only way to deliver performance reviews is face-to-face, with ample time to present and process, listen and respond," said Bailey. "It's just too important to relegate to email or telephone. Doing so would send a signal that you didn't care enough about the subject to even take the time to meet." After outlining any shortcomings or mistakes, take the time to discuss resolutions to those problems, and push employees to comment on the issues you raised. End on a positive note. Don't leave the review without mutual understanding and respect, and don't let any employee feel like they're in the dark going forward. "Use the review process as an opportunity to set attainable goals specific to addressing the expectations the employee isn't meeting but which also makes the employee feel like they have a clear, reasonable plan of action that can get them back on track," said Rasure. Encouraging your employees and expressing your appreciation gives an added boost to a primarily good review, or it lifts your employee's spirits after a somewhat negative evaluation. Positive reinforcement can go a long way in giving workers the confidence and drive they need to perform even better. Choose your words with care. Pay close attention to how you phrase your evaluations. Here are five words and expressions that will help you effectively highlight an employee's contributions, based on James E. Neal's book, "Effective Phrases for Performance Appraisals" (Neal Publications, 2009). Achievement: Incorporate this into a phrase, such as "achieves optimal levels of performance with/for ... " Communication skills: Phrases like "effectively communicates expectations," or "excels in facilitating group discussions" go a long way with an employee. Creativity: Appreciating employees' creative side can make for happier, more motivated staff. In a performance review, try "seeks creative alternatives," followed by specific examples and results. Improvement: Employees like hearing that they are improving, and that it's being noticed. "Continues to grow and improve," and "is continuously planning for improvement" are two constructive phrases to use in a performance review. Management ability: Having leadership skills and the ability to manage others is key for employee success. Incorporating phrases such as "provides support during periods of organizational change" can carry a lot of weight with your employee. Additionally, Richard Grote, author of "How to Be Good at Performance Appraisals "(Harvard Business Review Press, 2011), said that instead of using terms such as "good" or "excellent" in a review, employers should opt for more measurement-oriented language. In an interview with Hcareers.com, Grote noted that action words like "excels," "exhibits," "demonstrates," "grasps," "generates," "manages," "possesses," "communicates," "monitors," "directs" and "achieves" are more meaningful.
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aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Business
By Nicole Fallon, B2B Copy & Production: March 6, 2017 As an employee, your personal work style and approach may not matter much to anyone beyond your boss and immediate team members. However, when you become a leader, your behaviors and skills are suddenly in the spotlight. Because so many people are relying on you for guidance and inspiration, it's important to examine your habits and consider how they might be perceived in your leadership role. In her book, "The 9 Types of Leadership: Mastering the Art of People in the 21st Century Workplace" (Post Hill Press, 2017), author Beatrice Chestnut, Ph.D., defines nine different leadership styles. "The nine types ... are based on the nine personality styles articulated by the Enneagram model, a typology arrayed around an ancient symbol that has roots in timeless wisdom traditions," Chestnut told Business News Daily. "Each type is characterized by a specific focus on attention as well as specific strengths, motivations and blind spots." According to Chestnut, these are the focus areas of each leadership type: 1. Quality. This type of leader focuses on improvement, getting things right, making things as perfect as they can be, being ethical, following the rules and applying high standards.  2. Pleasing people. This leader focuses on being liked, creating relationships,  strategically supporting others to make themselves indispensable and empowering people.  3. Work tasks and goals. This type of leader wants to be efficient and productive and have the image of someone who is a successful achiever.  4. Emotions. This leader is focused on their internal experience and on expressing themselves so that people will understand and see them as being unique and special.   5. Data and work-related information. This leader is more comfortable operating on the intellectual level (as opposed to the emotional level), and is objective, analytical, private, and likes to work independently. 6. Potential problems. This leader focuses on noticing what might go wrong, forecasting problems before they happen so they can prepare for them ahead of time. This type of leader is an insightful problem solver who watches out for threats, is a good troubleshooter and specializes in assessing risks. 7. Innovation. This leader focuses on coming up with new ideas and planning for the future. This leadership style is optimistic, enthusiastic and automatically reframes negatives into positives.  8. Power and control. This leader prefers big-picture thinking to figuring out the details, likes to make big things happen, and has an easier time dealing with conflict and confrontation than some of the other types. 9. Creating harmony. This type of leader leads by consensus. They are a natural mediator, and want to make sure everyone is heard and that different points of view are considered when making plans and coming to decisions.  Playing to your strengths Each of the nine types of leaders are equal in their capacity for being effective, said Chestnut. However, some types are more oriented to being effective, based on the individual leader's motivations. "How effective a specific type of person is ... is based on two things: First, their personality style and its characteristic focus of attention and habitual patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving; second, how self-aware, developed and healthy they are," Chestnut said. "Every type can grow to leverage their strengths more consciously and address their specific challenges so they can be more effective."  Chestnut noted that leaders are most powerful when they can model self-awareness and self-development for the people they lead. It's important to become more aware of what you do well and what gets in your way of being effective, she said. By understanding the strengths of your type, you can apply your natural talents more consciously and strategically. Conversely, Chestnut added, recognizing your challenges allows you to develop those areas of weakness so they don't hold you back as a leader. The above types of leadership offer a framework for understanding that different people have different worldviews. "By helping leaders to see their habitual patterns, they can … ultimately make more conscious choices about the things they do and model a greater degree of self-awareness as a way of inspiring the people they work with," Chestnut said.
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aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Business
By Carlyann Edwards, B2B Editorial Intern: July 20, 2018 Women have learned that career success is not about adjusting to the male-dominated status quo. It's about changing that status quo by embracing what makes diverse perspectives unique, and overcoming the doubts that keep you from reaching your full potential. "Once I heard that I shouldn't expose my feelings at work, because this represents weakness, especially coming from a woman," said Mayra Attuy, a marketing head at Oath. "I see emotion, passion and compassion as valuable assets, not things to be ignored or hidden." The importance of leaving your comfort zone A commonly cited Hewlett-Packard study on internal hiring practices foundthat men often apply for a job when they meet 60 percent of the qualifications, but women apply only if they meet 100 percent of them. Reshma Sujani, founder and CEO of Girls Who Code, said that while girls are taught to play it safe, smile pretty and get all A's, boys are taught to play rough and swing high. "In other words, we're raising our girls to be perfect, and we're raising our boys to be brave," she said in a TED talk. Even when women are ambitious, the socialization of perfection often leads them to risk aversion, Sujani said. Devoreaux Walton, owner of Distinct Personal Branding, believes success is found outside of one's comfort zone, but is often hindered by the fear of the unknown. "Every successful entrepreneur and business leader did what they were afraid to do instead of just letting the fear rule in their personal and professional lives," she said. She recommends the best way to overcome fear is to acknowledge it; recognize it's there, but do it anyway. If you're too rigid, you could miss one of those serendipitous 'aha' moments that could inspire a creative solution or force a different approach. Angie Hicks, co-founder and chief marketing officer of Angie's List, had to face her fears when she was approached about starting the now-national customer review service as an introverted college graduate. "My biggest challenge was combating the fact that I was really shy and quiet," said Hicks at the inaugural American Express OPEN CEO BootCamp in 2013. "In starting a business, you have to get out and talk to people. I was doing door-to-door [subscription] sales, which was the last thing I ever thought I would do." Leaving her comfort levels paved the way for Hicks to take advantage of opportunities that never would have arisen otherwise. "Don't miss out on opportunities that come your way," she said. "Put yourself in a position to have those opportunities; know when one is facing you and take it." Seeing equality as a reality Many women have felt the effects of the gender gap during their careers, whether it was a pay dispute, a lost promotion or just a snide comment from a co-worker. Even if your work environment champions equality, it's not uncommon to encounter people who have faced some kind of discrimination, subtle or not, because of their gender. It's difficult to think this way when cases of gender inequality are talked about in the news and on social media every day. However, if women want to be viewed as equal in the workplace, they must stand their ground and demand the respect they deserve – and it starts by behaving as if the gap has been closed, said Paula Stephenson, director of marketing at Smoke's Poutinerie. "I have noticed that if you act like there's equality in the workplace, then there will be," Stephenson said. That's not to say that people should pretend inequality doesn't exist. Acknowledging the need for change is important, but more important are your actions and attitudes in the workplace. "Being a working mom in the corporate world is a daily challenge," Attuy said. Despite the struggle to find balance, Attuy considers her most proud professional moment when she returned from maternity leave. She believes that the fulfillment of her simultaneous personal and career success has made her a stronger marketer. For women just entering the workforce, Attuy recommends leading by example while being open, supportive and collaborative with others. With advancements like the #MeToo movement, discussions have been ignited, but there are still many barriers to overcome. "The big challenge is to keep our perspectives top of mind in conversations at the corporate level, and also among family and friends, so the mindset shift can happen," Attuy said. "Be resilient that change will come."
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aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Business
By Nicole Fallon, B2B Copy & Production: May 11, 2017 There's more to leadership than having a high-ranking title and being in charge of a team. You might have the authority to tell people what to do, but if you're an ineffective leader, you won't be able to guide and motivate your staff to accomplish their goals. "I think a great leader is one who makes those around him/her better. There are many litmus tests for a great leader, but I really look to those around them," said Dana Brownlee, founder of Professionalism Matters. "Are they growing, becoming better leaders themselves, motivated, etc.?" According to Brownlee, if you have engaged in the following behaviors, it's possible you're showing signs of being a weak leader: No one on your team has criticized one of your ideas in the past month. You spend more time planning your own career progression than planning that of your team members. You haven't had at least three completely non-work related conversations with a team member weekly. Different team members would provide different answers if asked your top three priorities for the year. Team members are afraid to fail. Business News Daily asked CEOs, managers and leadership experts for their best advice on becoming a better leader. Here's what they had to say. 1. Connect and communicate Leading a group of people requires a mutual sense of trust and understanding between the leader and the team members. As a first step toward that goal, leaders should learn to connect. Terry "Starbucker" St. Marie, a leadership writer and consultant, said that being what he calls a "more human" leader requires positivity, purpose, empathy, compassion, humility and love. These key traits will put you on the road to genuine connections with the members of your team. "Building a real personal connection with your teammates is vital to developing the shared trust necessary to build a strong culture of accountability and exceptional performance," St. Marie said. "With that culture in place, the team can achieve a successful business, a happy team and a fulfilled leader."  "I think the best leaders communicate often and are transparent (which is rare).  The best leaders also customize communications to best suit the situation and the recipient," Brownlee said. "This means they take the time to figure out which communication mode is preferred by each team member (e.g. are they a text person, email, phone, or face to face?)  They're also great listeners and are authentically interested in other people." Ruslan Fazlyev, CEO and founder of e-commerce solutions provider Ecwid, said that in all your communications, it's important to be genuine above all else. "There are many leadership styles; there's no right and wrong," Fazlyev said. "But there's genuine, and there's fake. There's no following to fake leadership."] 2. Know your team Once you've mastered the art of communicating and connecting with your team members, you can really get to know them — who they are, what they're interested in and what their talents are. "You can know your mission and vision, but it is equally, if not more, important to know your people," said Joe Nolan, CEO of Motus Global, a company that provides biomechanical analysis for athletes. "If you care about and take care of your people, they will take care of your customers, and ultimately, you will accomplish your mission." "A good leader knows his or her team better than anyone else — their strong skills and how they can be leveraged, as well as their weaknesses," added Alexander Negrash, director of marketing at cloud backup and storage solutions company CloudBerry Lab. 3. Encourage creativity If you want your staff to do their best work, you need to give them the freedom to brainstorm and explore, Negrash said. Be open to your team's ideas and suggestions, and be ready to consider them and possibly develop them further. "A good leader also gives the team new challenges, preventing them from becoming bored and complacent while showing confidence in their potential," Negrash added. 4. Focus on the positives As much as leaders wish that their team's day-to-day operations could run smoothly all the time, they're bound to run into the occasional obstacle. Whether it's a minor miscommunication or a major error, the way a leader handles a negative situation says a lot about his or her leadership skills. Robert Mann, author of "The Measure of a Leader" (iUniverse, 2013), recommended focusing on the good in any set of circumstances.  "Look at three positive things about a problem before you identify what makes it dissatisfying," Mann said. "The more you look at the positives in a problem, the more positively people react with one another."  In his research, Mann has found that, after individuals point out things they're happy with in a problematic situation, they don't feel so strongly about the problem and are better able to think clearly and solve it. The same is true when a leader needs to improve his or her strategy. If you or a team member notices a particular course of action you've taken that just isn't working, figure out some things you've done in the past that have worked. Similarly, Peter Fuda, author of "Leadership Transformed" (New Harvest, 2013), said that leaders can learn to focus on the positive by shifting from "critic" to "cheerleader" of their teams.  "This strategy involves moving from a focus on what is going wrong to what is going right," Fuda said. "Shining a light on issues and problems is an important part of transformation, but it must not become a leader's default setting. An important mantra I have shared with almost every leader I have met is, 'Don't let perfect get in the way of better.'"  5. Show, don't tell An effective leader knows how to show others what is required, rather than simply telling them. Luke Iorio, president and CEO of the Institute for Professional Excellence in Coaching (iPEC), said leaders should coach their team members toward a more collaborative, committed work environment — without coaxing them. "[If you are] controlling people to do certain things in certain ways, you're not going to get the level of engagement that you're looking for," Iorio said. "Coaching is about helping the people you lead recognize the choices they have in front of them. People will [then] take a great deal of ownership over the direction of the project."  6. Be direct Taso Du Val, CEO and founder of Toptal freelance talent network, said direct, honest feedback — even if it's criticism — is the best way to guide your team in the right direction. You also need to know exactly where your business is headed, so you can give them the right advice. "If you're not direct, people won't know what you truly think about them and their work, and they will never be able to improve," Du Val said. "If you don't know the precise direction your company is headed, no matter how much you've communicated to your employees and leadership team regarding their individual performance, they will flounder when it comes to making decisions and taking actions. Once those basic principles are in place, deadlines, regular product plans, performance reviews, structure and processes can easily be put into place." "Always share constructive feedback about anything that the team or each team player does," Negrash added. "Positive feedback is as important as negative, and a good leader strives for balance." 7. Ask for feedback Your team members aren't the only ones who can benefit from honest feedback. A true self-assessment of your own leadership can be difficult, so mentors, fellow professionals and even your own staff are invaluable in evaluating your effectiveness. According to St. Marie, talking to friends and peers often brings needed perspective on your leadership approach and style. Leadership coaching can also help you discover areas that need improvement. A professional who helps you develop a plan to achieve your leadership goals can be more motivational than books and seminars alone.  "Coaching allows leaders to make the connection and apply [changes] in a real-life setting," Iorio said. "You need time to integrate, process and reflect, and unless you go through those steps, you won't have sustainable change."  Fazlyev agreed, noting that your team can give you critical insight into what's working, what's not working and obstructions to success. 8. Understand your own motivation If a person in a leadership position views his or her role as "just a job," it's going to show. To be an effective leader, you need to have the right motivation. Is it the money or the prestige you care about, or do you sincerely want to inspire people to do their best? St. Marie advised leaders to really ask themselves why they want to lead.  "I look at leadership as an honor and a vocation," he told Business News Daily. "If, in your heart, you feel leadership is your destiny and how you'll make a difference in this world, then you are certainly starting from the right place."
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aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Business
By Paula Fernandes, Business News Daily Contributing Writer: April 3, 2017 You don't have to look much further than the news to find stories of corrupt leaders engaged in all sorts of ethical breaches. As the adage goes, "power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely." An abuse of power can get people into trouble, destroy careers and even bring down entire industries. So how do entrepreneurs and business owners rise above the fray and establish themselves as ethical leaders? The consensus of many experts in this area is that it must be done intentionally, by modeling ethical conduct and weaving it organically into every level of their organizations. "For leaders to be viewed as ethical, they must ensure that everyone – leaders, team members, customers, everyone – is treated with trust, respect and dignity in every interaction," said S. Chris Edmonds, executive consultant and founder of The Purposeful Culture Group. "To accomplish that, leaders must create a culture where values – how people treat each other – are as important as results, every day." Creating a culture of ethics To create this sort of ethics-focused company culture, start at the top, says leadership consultant and author Linda Fisher Thornton in her book "7 Lenses: Learning the Principles and Practices of Ethical Leadership" (2013). "Ethical leaders have a tremendous impact on how people in their organizations behave and what they achieve," Thornton said. "Effective leaders focus on what's right and exemplify to their people that they are there to help, and not to exploit the vulnerabilities of others." Once a company's leaders are on board, the next step is to instill this commitment to ethics throughout the organization. This may seem a bit daunting at first, but it is necessary in creating a business environment where ethical lapses are the anomaly and not the norm. "Employees behave ethically when the required ethical behavior is described to them in unambiguous terms and then modeled consistently at every level of the organization and recognized and rewarded," said Paul Glover, who provides ethics training and coaching to organizational leaders. "Ethical leadership means constantly acting in a manner that earns trust from your team, empowers employees to do their best work, and builds an office community that values fairness, encouragement and support as much as it does winning for our clients," added Christie Marchese, CEO of Picture Motion, a marketing and advocacy firm for issue-driven films. This consistent commitment to ethics may not be easy, but there are some practical ways leaders can integrate ethical conduct into their organizations and management styles. Thornton outlined several steps to ethical leadership: 1. Model ethical behavior. Be a leader who adheres to high ethical standards in your own professional life, consistently treating others with respect and authenticity. But be willing to talk honestly about difficult ethical choices. Openly discuss the ethical gray areas and acknowledge the complexity of work life. 2. Adopt transparency in decision-making and communications. Have an open-door policy and regular one-on-one meetings so employees know their suggestions and insights are welcome and valued. This will allow you to build trust and cultivate a respectful environment in which people can speak up about ethics and share the responsibility for living it. 3. Establish a formal ethics or values statement. This should be a living, breathing, foundational document that helps center your staff and guide them as they navigate ethical gray areas. The values communicated in this document must be modeled from the highest level of the organization on down, understood by employees at all levels, reinforced through regular training and other company events, and revisited and revised as the company grows or changes. 4. Insist everyone meets ethical expectations. Allow no excuses. Make sure that no one is exempt from meeting the adopted ethical standards. Maintain the status of ethics as a total, absolute must in the organization. Hold everyone, particularly senior leaders and high-profile managers, accountable. 5. Recognize and reward examples of ethical behavior. Be a proactive ethical leader, championing high ethical conduct and emphasizing prevention. Managers should talk about what positive ethics looks like in practice as often as they talk about what to avoid. Take time to celebrate positive ethical choices, and consider the radical step of rewarding employees who are brave enough to admit and learn from their mistakes. 6. Talk about ethics as an ongoing learning journey, not a once-a-year training program. Integrate ethics into every action of the organization – everything people do, touch or influence. Talk about ethics as an ongoing learning journey, not something you have or don't have. Recognize that the world changes constantly, and that ethical conduct requires that everyone remain vigilant.
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aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Business
By Sammi Caramela, B2B Staff Writer: December 19, 2017 It takes time to adjust to a new position at work, especially when you're taking on a management role. Your responsibility is to guide an entire team to success; instead of turning to someone for supervision, you're the person others turn to. It might feel like you're grasping at straws, but you're not alone – many new managers feel overwhelmed. We outlined characteristics of a good manager, management behaviors to avoid and management development options to get you started in your role. Characteristics of a good manager Every manager should work on developing these four characteristics. Collaborative You want to be passionate about working with your team and encourage your employees to feel the same. While independent work is important, teamwork can establish a more welcoming, supportive company culture. Summer Salomonsen, chief learning officer at Grovo, suggested delegating and coaching tasks, encouraging communication and feedback through regular one-on-one meetings, and prioritizing trust among the team. Growth-oriented As a manager, you should focus on helping your employees progress – individually and collectively. Get to know your workers on a personal level so you can help them leverage their interests and talents. Find what works and what doesn't. "Effective managers take a growth-oriented approach to employee development, challenging themselves and their reports to improve their performance and respond to setbacks," said Salomonsen. She noted that new managers should provide honest feedback, initiate necessary conversations, and anticipate and address resistance to change. Inclusive If you want your team to take risks and contribute to projects, you need to make sure they feel comfortable doing so. Salomonsen said that in order to inspire original thinking, managers should create an inclusive culture where everyone gets to voice their concerns, opinions and ideas. Encourage authenticity and vulnerability, and help your team cope with any work-related stress. Leading by example is a great way to achieve this. Just because you're a manager doesn't mean you can't ask for help. Turn to your team when you're at a loss. Start a conversation, and discuss their comments. Impact-driven Every worker wants to feel valued. If they don't believe their work is meaningful, making a difference in some way, they won't be as motivated. "To help direct reports see the 'why' behind their work, managers must learn to be impact-driven, aligning the team's activities with the broader goals of the organization and the values of each team member," said Salomonsen. She advised forming a connection between individual goals and company goals, reminding each worker why their job is so important. Show your appreciation for each member's effort, and step in to help anyone who falls behind. Behaviors to avoid "It's all too easy for new managers to adopt bad habits in the busy early days of their new role," said Salomonsen. "Without the right guidance, we typically see first-time managers fall into common behavior traps … " She noted six management behaviors to avoid: Only providing feedback during performance reviews or when issues arise. Micromanaging rather than trusting your team. Failing to ask for or address questions, feedback or concerns. Being closed-minded to criticism or new ideas. Avoiding difficult yet necessary conversations. Setting expectations too high or too low, or not being clear with your goals. Management development options You should never be left in the dark when taking on a new role. Here are three ways to learn and grow as a leader. Management training According to a research study by Grovo, 87 percent of managers wish they were given the chance to learn and progress when they first assumed their role, and nearly half of new managers felt that they were unprepared for their position. Every company should offer training before hiring. However, whether because of the price of programs or lack of time, many don't prioritize management development as much as they should. In fact, some even reserve these programs only for senior leaders, and offer them just a few times a year, said Salomonsen. "These sessions may be rewarding and inspiring, but they rarely make an impact on day-to-day work," she added. "Moreover, sending every new manager to a management seminar their first week on the job is prohibitively expensive for most companies." An option, especially for small businesses, is to turn to internal training. Host a few sessions with other company experts or managers to run through the basics. Often, employees are promoted to a management role, so they already have an idea of company standards and what's expected of them. Microlearning Microlearning is a popular training method for small businesses. It's quick, intensive and collaborative. Managers can learn all they need to know in short bursts, without feeling overwhelmed. "With microlearning, both new and experienced managers can access digestible lessons that focus on the critical behaviors they need to perform their best, right in the course of their day-to-day work," said Salomonsen. "Done right, a microlearning approach allows managers to quickly put new knowledge into practice and gradually improve their habits and skills over time." Not only is this method of learning more efficient, it's also far more affordable than extensive training programs. Mentors and L&D partners Working with a mentor or learning and development (L&D) partner can set new managers up for success by providing them with personal support and expert knowledge. "Each person is different, and every new manager has their own areas of growth in the early days of their new role," said Salomonsen. "Whether they need to develop their interpersonal skills, time management skills, strategic planning skills or leadership approach, they will need support from senior colleagues … Finding a management mentor or L&D partner early can help set a strong foundation for the new manager's development in their role." Keep an open mind about colleagues, friends and professional connections, and network as much as possible. Once you work with someone who can guide you through the beginning process, you'll feel more confident in your role.
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aoverton
Jul 25, 2018
In Business
Being a leader is not easy, and it often requires time and patience to master the role. At the core, all that most workers want is someone to guide them rather than boss them around. If your intentions and motives are in your company and team's best interests, you're unlikely to fail. But even if you're doing a great job of leading your team, there's always room for improvement. Here are six common leadership weaknesses and how you can fix them. 1. Lack of trust in employees New leaders often either micromanage their employees or take on more tasks than they can handle, all because they don't trust their teams to perform as well as they do. "This happens when leaders mistake their role and instead serve as taskmasters or managers in an effort to ensure that things get done," said Keisha A. Rivers, founder and chief outcome facilitator of The KARS Group Ltd. "The best approach is not to micromanage every detail of what has to be done, but to focus on specific outcomes and trusting your team to follow through. Having periodic checkups is best to insure progress is being made, rather than wanting to be cc'd on every single email or requiring your team to provide daily status reports." Heather Monahan, founder of career mentoring group Boss in Heels, added that many managers are afraid to trust their employees with company information, failing to share valuable material with them. "Deciding to share key pieces of information and watching how your team manages the information is a good recipe for building company wide trust," she said.  2. Excessive connectivity Being connected 24/7 has become a hallmark of the modern mobile workforce. Constant connectivity allows managers to provide feedback on the go and more easily manage workers across time zones, said Nicholas Thorne, CEO of digital badge platform Basno. The problem is that this can lead to an always-connected, omnipresent approach to leadership – and that's bad for managers and team members alike, he said. Thorne noted that being available at all times can ultimately disempower employees who feel they should always be online because their manager is, or believe they need to get their boss's approval on everything. "Leaders need to be proactive in empowering team members to work decisively," Thorne told Business News Daily. "Just because project management tools, instant messaging, email, etc. allow a manager to participate in every minute decision that gets made does not mean that that's good for everyone involved. Communicate clearly to set consistent expectations, [and] be quick to tell people, 'I trust your judgment.'" Monahan added that overcommitted leaders are often inaccessible. You should hold yourself accountable only to reasonable expectations. Stretching yourself too thin will do more damage than good, for you and the entire company. "Creating boundaries and realizing you can't do it all will allow you to cut back on additional commitments and focus on priorities," Monahan said. 3. Stagnancy All leaders eventually face the danger of getting stuck in their ways. The current way of doing things may be working, but it's important not to let yourself – or your team – grow stagnant. "The biggest threat to a successful business is becoming static and losing a desire for innovation," said Liz Elting, co-CEO of business language services firm TransPerfect. The best thing you can do for your team as a leader is communicate and instill a clear sense of why you're doing what you do, Elting said. Your company mission will likely lose credibility without continued innovation, and reminding the organization of its purpose will motivate you to collaborate and grow. To stay adaptive, leaders also need to listen to feedback from anyone who has a stake in the business, including clients. "Their feedback is the most valuable piece of information to the success of your company," Elting said. "Make it a top priority to not only solicit feedback from them, but [also] decipher that feedback and act upon it." 4. Needing to be liked Leaders are people first, and it's natural that they want to be liked, said David Scarola, chief experience officer of business resource The Alternative Board (TAB). But the need to be in everyone's good favor can sometimes cloud solid business judgment. "A common mistake with new managers and new business owners is that they make decisions that are popular, which are often not the best decisions for the business," Scarola said. "[Leaders] need to sometimes make unpopular decisions. That comes with the territory." Instead of trying to be well liked among your employees, seek instead to be understood and respected. Learn how to communicate openly and frequently with your team, and always keep staff members in the loop about the reason behind any decisions, popular or not.    "The best leaders have learned that if they make the right decisions for their business, even if unpopular, and also take the time to explain their reasoning, they will earn the respect of their employees," Scarola said. "In the long run, this is the best outcome a leader can aspire to." When you're dealing with performance evaluations, Monahan recommends conducting them based on specific metrics rather than being subjective. You can't stress over being someone's friend before being their boss. 5. Hypocrisy A "do what I say, not what I do" mentality is toxic to your work environment. As a leader, you set an example for your team. If you want your employees to respect and listen to you, you must follow your own rules. You can't hold your staff accountable if you aren't willing to work just as hard. "A leader must have the utmost and highest level of integrity and model the way for their team," said Daniel Freschi, president of leadership development company EDGE. "If you leave early during the workday or speak offhand about a colleague, it will likely be repeated by your direct reports. To avoid this, a leader needs to clarify their values and be hyper-aware of their behavior and hold themselves to the same or higher standards that you would direct reports." "Leaders often want to create a certain type of environment but don't want to actually participate in the culture they are determined to create," added Monahan. "If you are seeking to create a collaborative environment, ask yourself first if you are collaborating and sharing with others. Putting yourself in everyone else's shoes will pay dividends." You don't want to isolate yourself from the rest of your team, so don't be aloof or act like you are better than your employees, Monahan advised. This will only create tension and frustrate employees. It's better to be open about your flaws with your workers. The more transparent you are, the more authentic your entire team will be. "By slowly letting others in and sharing failures and challenges, you will begin to appear more real, and employees will begin to believe in you," she added. "When you make yourself vulnerable, you make yourself relatable." 6. Failing to set clear expectations Employees would rather be instructed on what to do than be left with questions and uncertainty. Providing directions and outlining missions will motivate your team and keep them on track. "When a leader does not set expectations, their direct reports often limp through their day with no clear direction," said Freschi. "Direct reports want to be productive; they want to know their work has meaning and is contributing to a bigger picture. Without expectations or goals, they are not able to prioritize the workload." While it's important to trust your workers with their tasks, this doesn't mean you shouldn't delegate assignments and highlight objectives to get the ball rolling. Leaders should set individual goals for workers and explain how they align with the broader work of the organization, Freschi added. "As leaders, it's up to you to provide a clear but succinct picture of the vision and desired outcomes for the team and the organization," said Rivers. "People connect to a project or task much easier if they know where it's headed. Don't keep them in the dark … Determine what information is important and then provide clear instructions and expectations to set them up for success – not failure." Businessnewsdaily.com
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